Kentucky Fried Movie, 1977

Director

John Landis

Cast

visit Los Angeles

Los Angeles: Flights: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

Yamashiro, 1999 North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood (tel 323.466.5125)

Rialto Theatre, 1023 South Fair Oaks Avenue, South Pasadena (tel: 626.388.2122)


Trivia

John Landis went on to direct The Blue Brothers and An American Werewolf in London.

Kentucky Fried Movie location: The Rialto, South Fair Oaks Avenue, Pasadena

Kentucky Fried Movie location: Experience the thrill of ‘Feel-a-around’: The Rialto, South Fair Oaks Avenue, Pasadena

Hit-and-miss sketches – though with more hits than misses – in the first appearance of John Landis, as director, and the Airplane! team of Zucker-Zucker-Abrahams, as producers.

The cinema showing See You Next Wednesday (John Landis’ trademark film-within-a-film title) is the Rialto Theatre, 1023 South Fair Oaks Avenue at Oxley Street, South Pasadena.

The Rialto is the cinema where Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins) meets the doomed screenwriter (Vincent d’Onofrio) in Robert Altman’s The Player), and its interior is the site of the premiere of movie-within-a-movie Stab in Wes Craven’s Scream 2.

Kentucky Fried Movie location: Dr Klahn's hideaway: Yamashiro Restaurant, North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles

Kentucky Fried Movie location: Dr Klahn’s hideaway: Yamashiro Restaurant, North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles

The mountain hideaway of evil mastermind Dr Klahn (Bong Soo Han) in the extended A Fistful of Yen parody, is Yamashiro, 1999 North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood.

A Japanese restaurant, built by hundreds of Oriental craftsmen in 1913-14, the cedar and teak replica of a Japanese palace comes complete with teahouse, gardens and an imported 600-year-old pagoda. It stands in the Hollywood Hills on a single track road, north of the suburb, with spectacular views over Hollywood itself.

Yamashiro can also be seen in Dominic Sena’s 2000 remake of Gone In 60 Seconds, with Nicolas Cage and Angelina Jolie and Blake EdwardsBlind Date, but its most famous screen appearance is as the ‘American Officers’ Club’ in 1957’s Sayonara, with Marlon Brando.

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